Unless you are a major technological innovator such as Amazon or Google, it’s nearly impossible to stay ahead of “The Curve.” On Wednesday, October 16, 2019, Webolutions brought in local executives to discuss how they stay ahead of “The Curve” in their respective industries, inspiring one another to share how they are innovative in their workplace.

The Technological Curve

One of Webolutions’ favorite illustrations of “The Curve” is the Accelerating Growth in Technology Curve. With successive groups of consumers adopting the new technology (shown in blue), its market share (yellow) will eventually reach the saturation level. In mathematics, the yellow curve is known as the┬álogistic function. The curve is broken into sections of adopters.

One aspect of technology that Denver-area executives are most concerned with is cyber-terrorism. “It’s very hard to stay ahead of the bad guys,” said one executive in the IT field, pointing how data systems can be held hostage from cyber threats on a daily basis. “We are moving faster and faster on a technological parallel.”

Social and Behavioral Shifts

In addition to technology, local executives are shifting the way they communicate with their organization. And when it comes to consumers and audiences connecting with an organization, the buyer has all the power. Some of the challenges Denver leaders have had to face regarding consumer-client expectations include:

  • Commoditization
  • Convenience
  • Loyalty
  • Customization
  • On Demand

Attendees pointed out how their organization needs to act like a “school of fish” and follow customer trends and how they interact with organizations. “And once you figured out those trends, you can then break free from the school and innovate,” said John Vachalek, CEO and Founder of Webolutions.

Hiring to “The Curve”

With technology and behavioral shifts, it can be a challenge for Denver-area executives to hire correctly to stay ahead of “The Curve.” One executive in the civil engineering industry has allocated company resources, including technology consumer trends and staffing, by revamping the company website. “[Our website] is becoming a bigger tool to attract and retain talent,” he said.

Another executive in the public service sector has pointed out that she has leveraged the P-Tech program, an education education model that offers high-school students to develop skills and competencies that will translate directly to competitive careers, for recruiting. “They enter the workforce ready to go,” she said.

Do you know executives for whom a Webolutions Executive Roundtable would be a positive experience, whose perspectives would be valuable for our attendees? Please refer them by completing this brief form or sign up for our next event.