The Big Egg Hunt from Fabergé is wrapping up this week in London and is a great example of combining the online and offline components of a marketing campaign to build an experience that is bigger than the sum of its parts.

The promotion began a few months ago when 209 eggs were distributed to artists, designers, architects and other creative professionals to decorate in their unique style. These two-and-a-half-foot-tall eggs were then put on display in February to kick off the Big Egg Hunt and they spent six weeks in various locations all over the United Kingdom’s capital. All of the eggs are being brought to a central location this week and will be auctioned off to benefit Action for Children and Elephant Family.

Here is a quick overview of some of the main components of The Big Egg Hunt and how they worked together to create a memorable overall experience.

The Big Egg Hunt website. The main website for the promotion is an attractive and fun site that gives visitors an overview of the whole promotion, maps to find the eggs, artist information and more. The corporate Fabergé site included a logo for the promotion in the footer on their main page as well, so visitors to the main site could learn more.

The hunt. Each egg on display had a key word and when egg hunters located the egg they could text the word to enter to win the Diamond Jubilee Egg worth £100,000. Egg hunters with a smartphone could also scan a QR code to add that egg to their virtual collection on Facebook.

The eggs. Having 209 different designers and artists give their personal stamp to each egg created a diverse and interesting overall collection.

The charity fundraiser. Consumers who participated in the contest also helped raise money for two charities: Action for Children and Elephant Family. Adding a philanthropic component to any promotion like this is always something to consider. You can enhance the overall experience when participants are also able to contribute and help those in need during your campaign.

The maps. The 209 eggs were hidden across 12 “Egg Zones” in London. Each zone had a whimsical map that helped egg hunters zero in on their quarry. And if things got frustrating, a cheat sheet was available to make sure people didn’t lose interest in The Hunt.

Support for local retailers. Most of the eggs were placed in retail shopping districts and CNBC reported the contest looks like it had a positive impact on the local economy.

Facebook and Twitter. Interested egg aficionados who lived outside of London could experience the fun on Facebook and Twitter. The Facebook page complemented the main site with updates and news during the contest and Twitter was a channel to answer questions as they came up.

What ways can you use online marketing to drive clients to real-world locations in your next marketing campaign? Also look for ways to extend the real-world experience of your brand to your online channels with QR codes and other social media calls to action.